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News: Safety experts blame lack of police for rise in road deaths

Accidents rose by 4% over a year


News: Safety experts blame lack of  police for rise in road deaths

THE NUMBER of people killed or seriously injured on Britain’s roads rose by 4% in the 12 months to September 2014, compared with the previous period. According to data from the Department for Transport (DfT), 24,360 people were killed or seriously injured between September 2013 and September 2014, up from 23,380 the previous year.


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The latest figures reveal that 36% were car users, 23% pedestrians, 14% cyclists, 23% motorcyclists and 4% other road users.

Overall, the number of deaths increased by 1% (from 1,711 to 1,730), while there were 5% more casualties (all injuries and fatalities) in total — 192,910, compared with 184,087.

The rise follows years of decreasing casualty numbers, and the number of deaths is still a fraction of the highest recorded postwar annual total of nearly 8,000 in 1966.

The Institute of Advanced Motorists (IAM), a road-safety charity, blamed government cutbacks and a drop in visible policing for the increase. Neil Greig, IAM director of policy and research, said: “It is disappointing that after many years of solid falls in the numbers of people killed and injured on our roads, the government has taken its eye off the ball.

“These figures reflect our view that cuts in visible policing and road-safety spending have had an impact, with a third successive quarter of increases.”

The DfT said that the rise may be the result of increased traffic levels.


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